Mexico City - Post Report Question and Answers

Would someone with physical disabilities have difficulties living in this city?

It's certainly not at the level of accessibility one finds in the States, but I think generally someone with a physical disability would be able to get around the city. The sidewalks can be uneven, though. - May 2020


There are some ramps on the streets and sidewalks but in varying states of repair. There would be challenges but it isn't as bad as a lot of countries. - Apr 2019


Yes, the sidewalks can be in ill repair and minimal handicap access to buildings. - Jun 2018


Yes: sidewalks are very uneven and people regularly block the ramps by parking their cars in the way. - May 2017


Many! Sidewalks are in poor repair. Most buildings are not wheelchair accessible. - Sep 2016


Sometimes, although many places are well equipped. It all depends on the area you want to visit. Many streets have issues like things poking out or unexpected holes. Look carefully where you're walking. - Jun 2016


Yes, sidewalks are a nightmare, even in Polanco, for parents pushing a stroller or for someone in a wheelchair. That said, probably still better than much of the world. - May 2016


Unfortunately, yes. They have updated sidewalks in some areas so that there are ramps to street level but usually its even a challenge to get up the curbs with a stroller. Neither the metro nor bus has universal wheelchair access. - May 2016


It probably depends very much on where you live and work. Many sidewalks are old and uneven, but the next block is perfect. Some sidewalks have wheelchair ramps, some don't. Apartments seem to all have elevators. - May 2016


A little. The city seems to be trying to be wheelchair friendly but I've noticed pushing a stroller around that you'll often have a sidewalk ramp on one side of the street only to be met by a very large curb at the other side. - Oct 2014


Extremely difficult - sidewalks are barely walkable for those who don't have any physical disabilities. - Aug 2014


Depends on the location. I can't speak to it totally but where we lived, there were lots of accommodations for wheelchairs (curb cuts, mini-elevators for use on those half-staircases, etc.) That said, if an elevator is out, someone is probably out of luck. - Apr 2014


Oh yes! In some areas they plant trees in the miiddle of the sidewalk, even able bodied person can't pass without squeezing into it. Most sidewalks are uneven, sometime there is a hole or something sticking out - usually a piece of iron metal. If there is a wheelchair ramp, it is either high, tiny or broken. - Mar 2014


Depends. The streets are broken, but there are wheelchair ramps everywhere. Most business seem to be accommodating. - Dec 2013


Polanco is okay, there are ramps, etc in the streets. The rest of the city an be difficult for physically-disabled people, although mexicans are very polite and always eager to help anytime. Mexico City is improving its infrastructure for the disabled, but it still has a long way to go. - Jul 2013


They do try to make it easy for the physicaly-challenged population. - Jan 2013


Sidewalks are very tricky, full of bumps & holes. - May 2012


The sidewalks - where they exist - are in rough shape. Wheelchairs, crutches, even high heels can pose a problem. - Apr 2010


It is not prepared for them. - Feb 2010


Probably a lot. Sidewalks are generally in pretty bad shape from poor construction/maintenance and buckling from earthquakes. Access to buildings seems mixed. - Jan 2010


It is a tough city in that regard. Mexico City is difficult to navigate at any time, and would be even more so with physical disabilities. - Mar 2009


The sidewalks are difficult for wheelchairs and strollers...nearly impossible. Of course, elevators are everywhere, but common transportation is not stroller/wheelchair friendly - Nov 2008


This is not the best city for a person with disabilities. They are coming around, but it will be many more years before they are even close to the welcome they receive in the U.S. - Oct 2008


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