How would you describe the availability and cost of groceries and household supplies relative to your home country?

Almost everything can be found here if you know where to look. We have access to the military base an hour away where you can pretty much get anything you may be longing for from home. Be prepared to pay a fortune for groceries here though as nothing seems cheap. A bag of groceries that may cost you $50 in the US will easily cost minimum $100 here. - Feb 2019


Groceries tend to be a little more expensive than in the Washington, DC, area, but some things are cheaper. If you are on the Diplomatic list, you get a gas card which eliminates the tax surcharge, and gas will be a lot less expensive. - Feb 2019


While arguably comparable to D.C. prices, in general, groceries are much more expensive than many other parts of the world (including other parts of Europe), but you can pretty much get anything you want. There is also the commissary at Chièvres AFB, which is notably cheaper than the local economy, and only 45 minutes away. Do be ready for nearly everything to be closed on Sundays, and by 7-8pm other days. If you work late, Saturday shopping might be your only option! - May 2018


A lot of people complain that groceries are expensive here. If you don't have a car and shop at the neighborhood shops and markets in Ixelles/Elsene or the Woluwes, groceries can be painfully expensive (and don't get me started on the prices at Rob). If you shop at the hypermarkets (Hyper Carrefour, Cora) or discounters (Colruyt, Aldi, Lidl), groceries aren't that much more expensive than in the DC area. Same goes for the street markets--a kilo of the exact same olives costs over twice as much at the Stokkel market (an expensive area) as at the market in Anderlecht (a working-class area with a large North African population).

The one thing that's consistently more expensive is meat, especially beef, but you can buy American beef at American prices at Chièvres.

Availability is generally pretty good--you can get 98% of the same sorts of things here. Brussels has a couple large Asian grocery stores, and if you really get in a bind you can shop at the commissary at Chièvres. - Jan 2018


You can pretty much find anything you need with few exceptions. For example, it is very difficult to find American style peanut butter or things like hot dogs. You can always make periodic trips to the military commissary if you are in need of those items. Otherwise the grocery stores have good selections of meats, cheeses, produce and wonderful french wine. Cost depends on where you shop. Rob the Gourmet is higher end and comparable to Whole Foods. Fresh Med is a gem for produce and is very low cost. - Feb 2017


There are 2 grocery stores, 3 bakeries and numerous restaurants within walking distance. We find the cost of groceries on the local economy to be reasonable.There's nothing we need to buy at the U.S. base and have only been there once when our sponsor took us. You can find fresh fruits, vegetables, cheeses, specialty meats and fish from the local farmer's market which is held two days per week. - Dec 2016


You can find anything you want if you are not particular about a specific brand. Meat is quite expensive but seasonal fruits and vegetables are fresh, plentiful, and reasonably priced. I do most of my shopping at the commissary (an hour away) and supplement my fresh foods on the economy. Great yogurt, cheese, chocolate etc. - Aug 2014


Just about everything you could possibly want can be found here between the well-stocked local supermarkets and specialty stores and the commissary at the base. Prices on the local economy can be pretty pricey, so try to keep an eye on the sale ads and buy when things are on sale. I stock up on meat, canned goods, sodas and baking supplies at the base. Veggies, fruit, milk and eggs I buy on the local economy. - Jul 2014


For a family of 4, we easily spend 120-150 Euros per week on groceries. - Apr 2014


Costs are high as in other Western European cities. U.S. government employees can access a commissary at an airbase one hour south of Brussels. It's just like shopping at a U.S. grocery store with dollar prices equivalent to those you'd find in the U.S. suburbs. This is a great savings for those with families. - Jan 2014


Groceries and household supplies are expensive. American diplomats can use Chievres Air Base Commissary though to offset that somewhat. - Jan 2014


Expensive. I shopped exclusively at the US Base, otherwise it would have been a very expensive tour for a first-tour employee. Bakeries abound and are very good. Stores are closed on Sundays. - Oct 2012


Everything available, cost is normal. - May 2012


We buy all of our fresh fruits and vegetables at the local market (there is one in a different section of the city every day of the week).It's a bit more expensive than the U.S., but the quality is also higher. For meats, household items, etc., we have access to Chievres Commissary which is 45 minutes away. It's just like any large supermarket in middle America with prices that are much cheaper than the local supermarkets or even the east and west coasts of America. It really allows you to stretch your money. - Jan 2012


Extensive. Belgians like quality and will pay for it. Expect to shell out 20-30% more than back home but you'll get quality - Nov 2011


Many people shop regularly at the commissary in Chievres, which is about 45 minutes from Brussels. But you can also find anything and everything on the local market. Prices in the grocery stores and some of the local markets are higher than the US, but if you look around you can find good deals in some of the outdoor markets and less expensive stores. - Aug 2011


If you shop at the local markets you can save a bundle on produce. Supermarket chains here are Delhaize and GB/Carefour. Delhaize in belgian and can be higher end. GB/Carefour is French is and is more mid range. Meat can be expensive. If you are with the US embassy you have access to Chievre air base about 45 minutes away with a full commissary and PX which can save you money, but limits your local exposure. The markets are fun to shop at, especially Gare Midi or Watermael-Boisfort on Sunday, Stokkel or Flagey on Saturday. And Place Chatelain on Wednesday night. Every day there is a market somewhere in the city ... except Thursday I think. Which is when everyone seems to go to Place Luxembourg and Par-Tay!!! - Jul 2011


Everything is available - but expensive, comparing with UK/FRance/Germany. - Jun 2011


Groceries are more expensive, but it's easier to buy small quantities here. Many people (especially with families) shop at the Chievres commissary every weekend (which is an hour outside Brussels) as it has US brands and US prices. - Jun 2011


I spend about EUR 80 a week for groceries and supplies. - Jun 2010


Everything is available, though a bit more expensive than in the U.S. - Jun 2010


Cost depends on where you shop - there are great markets, also some discount groceries. And of course, other great groceries that are more expensive. - Mar 2010


It is very expensive here but you can get everything. - Jul 2009


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