What types of jobs do most expatriate spouses/partners have? Locally based or telecommuting? Full-time or part-time? Can you comment on local salary scales?

There are actually many EFM jobs available at the embassy. Others work in local private schools, and many work remotely for US employers. Salaries are significantly lower than similar jobs in America, in line with the low cost of living in Turkey. - Sep 2020


The Embassy has a number of full and part-time positions for family members. Anything beyond that would require native-level Turkish. With the massive fall in value of the Turkish Lira relative to the U.S. dollar (and subsequent volatility), I don't know how financially rewarding holding a job on the local economy would be. Given Turkey's good internet, some folks teleworked (or tele-studied). - Oct 2018


Very limited work opportunities for spouses who do not speak fluent Turkish. - Oct 2018


Most spouses either work at the embassy or at the international schools. Mostly full-time. A good amount of EFM jobs, and there are four major schools where one can work. The bilateral agreement allows for teaching and medical professionals to get work visas easily. - Sep 2018


There are part-time jobs, full-time jobs, EPAP jobs, etc. Please be aware that post has a new policy that if you use your veteran's preference, you can't use it again during this tour although it's not clear to me why this is a rule. - Jul 2018


The EFM hiring freeze has been a real problem for morale but also embassy efficiency (fewer hours for DPO, longer waits to see medical personnel for non-emergencies, etc.). Turkey is a poor country compared to the EU with whom it competes, but it's still a prosperous country. - Oct 2017


Most spouses work at the Embassy. There are a few that work for international schools around the city. It is possible to obtain a work permit, but salaries in Turkey are about a third of what the same job would pay in the US. - Sep 2017


The embassy has a lot of EFM positions for all sections. They work hard to make sure that everyone that wants to work can find a job. Due to labor laws there are few options outside the mission. - Jun 2017


If you are a diplomatic spouse, the restriction are tough. You can work at the embassy or in an "education/teaching" job. Or telecommute. This is a real struggle for alot of highly professional and qualified spouses here. - Sep 2016


Some EFM positions and some English teaching options available. - Jun 2016


Teaching, subbing, embassy work.... the usual three. - Feb 2015


It depends on your legal status here and whether you know Turkish. - Jun 2014


Not really. I was offered jobs at local schools provided I didn't apply for the work permit... - Apr 2014


Yes, if you are willing to not go through the official channels and don't expect tons of money. Lost of teaching and translation opportunities. If you are expecting a job at the Embassy be prepared to be in competition with many others. Not many people speak English in Ankara so people who do not want to learn some Turkish and leave the confines of the American English population are desperate to work there. But like at all embassies, jobs are not great and not guaranteed. The people with the worst morale here in Ankara are dependents who end up settling for whatever they can snag for work from the few jobs at the Embassy and then complain about that. - Mar 2014


No. - Mar 2014


No. Diplomat spouses are prohibited from working on the local economy except in the education field. Consequently, many spouses seek to work at the Embassy. However the number of Embassy jobs compared to the number of applicants is inadequate and job hunting can become cut throat. Do not expect to get a job at the Embassy until you have been living here close to a year. - Jul 2013


If you teach, yes. Otherwise, not really, unless you speak fluent Turkish. - Aug 2011


Without knowing Turkish, it'll be difficult to find work in the local economy. A lot of spouses work at the embassy or the base. - Jul 2010


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